DÜRER A–Z

THE EARLY DÜRER
Find out surprising and interesting details about Dürer’s works and companions.

AD
BLOCK PRINT
CELTIS, CONRAD
DANDY
EARLY WORK
FATHER’S DEATH
GOLDSMITH
HANDS IN PRAYER
ITALY
JOHN THE EVANGELIST
KOBERGER, ANTON
LEIBNIZ ASSOCIATION
MOTHER
NEUBAUER, ANTON
OSIRIS
PIRCKHEIMER, WILLIBALD
QUEST FOR PERFECTION
RIDERS AND SOLDIERS
S 493
TÜCHLEIN
ULTRAMARINE
VIEWS OF NUREMBERG
WOLF III. HALLER
XANTIPPA
YNGUIRIALIS
ZWICKAU ALTARPIECE
AD
… the monogram Dürer developed in the 1490s is one of the earliest copyright protections in media history and the first consistently applied artist’s mark. From 1497 onward, Dürer signed each of his woodcuts and paintings with “AD”, shortly thereafter a monogram famous all over Europe.
BLOCK PRINT
… this small board of wood, incised with a depiction of St Jerome in his Study 520 years ago, still attracts divided opinions: did Dürer design the scene for a Basel printer or not? Which locations did Dürer visit on his journeyman travels and what role did his stay in Basel play?
CELTIS, CONRAD
… a native of the Franconian wine region named Conrad Pickel; he changed his name to the more melodic Celtis and became a university professor. He was considered the greatest scholar of Latin among Germans. Dürer had much to thank him for since Celtis was his first literary panegyrist: in a poem he pronounced Dürer’s paintings equal to the works of antiquity.
DANDY
… someone who is (perhaps too much) concerned with his physical appearance. Was Dürer a vain dandy? One might think so judging by his finery in the Self-Portrait in Madrid. In any case, the carefully tended hair and beard of the blond, curly-haired youth were already during his lifetime the subject of teasing jokes made by the people around him.
EARLY WORK
… early works are an enormous challenge, since with them the criteria which later define the master are first formulated. Like Mozart, Dürer was greatly encouraged by his father. However, scholars disagree fervently about the early work of the Wunderkind. The question is, are the qualitative differences in Dürer’s work the result of his ambitious struggle for new forms and perfection, or are there Dürer Doppelgängers, other young artists who were similarly precocious? The exhibition searches for new answers.
FATHER’S DEATH
… Dürer’s father, a prominent goldsmith who had emigrated from Hungary, died in the middle of the night on 20 September, 1502. Except for a servant and a woman hired specifically to pray over the dying man, the old Dürer was alone in his last hour. His son Albrecht and his wife Barbara were asleep, something the son later regretted deeply: “I looked on the dead with great sorrow because I had not been worthy to be with him at his end”.
GOLDSMITH
... Dürer’s father was a goldsmith, and at the start of his artistic training, Albrecht apprenticed in his father’s workshop. However, the young Dürer decided he would rather be a painter, and thus transferred to the workshop of Michael Wolgemut. Late in his career, Dürer would provide sketches for goldsmithwork.
HANDS IN PRAYER
… in fact, not by the early Dürer (see also: Early Work) since it dates from 1508. However, the meticulous nature studies of Dürer’s youth were prerequisites for such a masterful later figure study)
ITALY
… what drew Dürer to the south: the landscape, wine, women, Venetian luxury goods or the great artists of the Italian Renaissance, Andrea Mantegna and Giovanni Bellini? In 2012, the exhibition will offer surprising answers.
JOHN THE EVANGELIST
… is the author of the biblical doomsday story of the Apocalypse. With his illustrations to the Apocalypse, Dürer self-confidently places himself beside the visionary gospel writer as an ingenious pictorial inventor. The exhibition shows the Apocalypse cycle in its entirety, including the famous woodcut The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. With his dramatic staging of the scenes, was Dürer in effect a late fifteenth-century Steven Spielberg.
KOBERGER, ANTON
… was Dürer’s godfather. He was also a publisher, whose press produced the famous Nuremberg Chronicle of 1493. The workshop of Michael Wolgemut, where Dürer apprenticed, provided woodcut illustrations for the book.
LEIBNIZ ASSOCIATION
… one of the four largest German scientific organisations, comprised of 87 research institutions. It coordinates competitions for research funding from the national “Pakt für Forschung und Innovation” (“Joint Initiative for Research and Innovation”). One of the projects sponsored is “The Early Dürer” (2009-2011) at the Germanisches Nationalmuseum.
MOTHER
… Dürer’s mother, Barbara Holper, bore 18 children. When she died at age 63 after a long illness, her son Albrecht was inconsolable: “I have such sorrow from this, that I cannot express it”, he noted in his Gedenkbuch. The young Dürer had already portrayed his mother shortly after his painting apprenticeship: this portrait and the exhibited likeness of his father are among Dürer’s earliest surviving paintings.
NEUBAUER, ANTON
… is famous because this portrait was on the old 10 Deutsche-Mark bill. An old inscription on the painting, which identifies Neubauer as the painter and Dürer as the sitter, has created much confusion. Whether in fact the situation is reversed, i.e. Dürer painted the portrait of Anton Neubauer, is still disputed. Lucas Cranach has also been mentioned as a possible artist.
OSIRIS
… is a digital infra-red camera developed in 2005-2006. With infra-red photographs, structures of a painting which remain invisible to the naked eye, for example underdrawings, can be detected. In the Dürer Laboratory, see the unexpected and spectacular discoveries in the young artist’s works made with the Osiris camera.
PIRCKHEIMER, WILLIBALD
… For Dürer, the human figure could only achieve perfect beauty through balanced, harmonious proportions. From early on in his career, therefore, he created mathematical theories for the creation of such perfect figures. This theoretical work became a lifelong interest of the artist, culminating eventually in his later published artistic treatises.
QUEST FOR PERFECTION
… For Dürer, the human figure could only achieve perfect beauty through balanced, harmonious proportions. From early on in his career, therefore, he created mathematical theories for the creation of such perfect figures. This theoretical work became a lifelong interest of the artist, culminating eventually in his later published artistic treatises.
RIDERS AND SOLDIERS
… were popular motives in the graphic arts of the German Renaissance. Armed with pikes and dressed in elaborate costumes, Landsknechte (or lansquenets) are often featured in Dürer’s visual world. These mercenaries would have been a common sight around 1500. On foot or on horseback, such characters and motifs provided ideal opportunities to depict movement and devise innovative narrative strategies.
S 493
… “House Burgstraße 27: charming timber frame corner house with view, in a choice location directly below the city fortifications”. Where and how the young Albrecht Dürer lived and what the cryptic sign “S 493” had to do with Dürer’s neighbour is revealed in the Dürer Laboratory.
TÜCHLEIN
… is what Dürer called his paintings on canvas; such works of glue tempera on linen played a surprisingly important role in his early artistic output. In the exhibition you will see the “Tüchlein” Hercules and the Stymphalian Birds and find out more about the technique and the original functions of these delicate paintings.
ULTRAMARINE
… is a natural pigment whose major component is lapis lazuli. Ultramarinus, Latin for “from the other side of the sea”, was imported from Afghanistan. At the time of Dürer, the costly blue pigment was only rarely used north of the Alps. Wolf III Haller was able to afford a picture of the Madonna painted by Dürer with ultramarine blue.
VIEWS OF NUREMBERG
... In his landscape watercolors and drawings, Dürer frequently depicted views of his hometown and the countryside nearby. In this famous example, Dürer shows the wire drawing mill, located just outside the western city walls of Nuremberg.
WOLF III. HALLER
… son of a Nuremberg patrician family. He married Ursula, the daughter of Dürer’s godfather Anton Koberger, and commissioned the so-called Haller Madonna. You will find out in the spring of 2012 how this honest son-in-law and sensitive art connoisseur turned into an out-and-out bully.
XANTIPPA
… was Socrates’s wife; she was described as having had an argumentative spirit. It is the less-than-flattering name given by an early admirer of Dürer to his wife Agnes Frey. True or false – “bad wife” or “my Agnes”? In our exhibition we will explain how a childhood friendship became a union for life, and how Willibald Pirckheimer and Dürer’s biographers ruined the good reputation of an experienced businesswoman.
YNGUIRIALIS
… also known as Sternkraut (“Star-Herb”) or Cirsium. In the exhibition you will discover what this has to do with Dürer, his married life and the belief in astrology.
ZWICKAU ALTARPIECE
… an early major work by Dürer’s later master Michael Wolgemut, painted in 1479 in the neighbourhood of the eight-year old Dürer. A view of Nuremberg’s Laufer Tower square, showing the vibrant street life of a late-medieval city, was recently discovered in the background of the painting.

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Öffentliche Ausstellungsführungen

Erfahren Sie, welche prägenden Einflüsse der „frühe Dürer“ erfuhr und welche künstle-rischen Themen ihn beschäf-tigten. Begegnen Sie dabei den Meisterwerken Dürers und seiner Zeitgenossen. Ein Abstecher ins Dürer-Labor erlaubt einen Blick hinter die Kulissen der aktuellen Dürer-Forschung.

Täglich 16.00 Uhr und zusätzlich
Mittwoch 18.00 Uhr und 18.30 Uhr sowie Sonntag 10.30 Uhr

Kosten: € 2,00 zzgl. Eintritt; Die öffentlichen Ausstellungs-
führungen richten sich ausschließlich an Einzel--
besucher!

DER FRÜHE DÜRER

24.05. bis 02.09.2012

Öffnungszeiten
Mo - So 10.00-20.00 Uhr
Mi, Do 10.00-21.00 Uhr

Café ARTE

Mo - So 10.00-20.00 Uhr
Mi, Do 10.00-21.00 Uhr
Fahrer und Reiseleiter frei
Telefon +49 911 13 31-286

Museumsshop

Mo - So 10.00-20.00 Uhr
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Telefon +49 911 13 31-371

Dürer neu gesehen - ab jetzt in Nürnberg

ZDF Aspekte
11.5.2012

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Albrecht Dürer - SF Kultur

SF - Schweizer Fernsehen
30.5.2012

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Kulturwelt heute - BR

Bayerischer Rundfunk
30.5.2012

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RegionalZeit Gespräch mit Dr. Daniel Hess

BR Bayern 2
17.1.2012

Das Germanische Nationalmuseum in Nürnberg plant für 2012 unter anderem eine Dürer-Schau. Dr. Daniel Hess berichtet über die Vorbereitungen und welche weiteren Schwerpunkte das Museum im laufenden Jahr setzen will.

» RegionalZeit Gespräch in der ARD Mediathek

Staunen über Dürer

Literatur über Dürer füllt Regalmeter. Alles gesagt also? Beileibe nicht, meinen die Wissenschaftler im Germanischen Nationalmuseum (GNM) und können schon zur Halbzeit ihres großen, mit 860.000 Euro von der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft finanzierten Projektes interessante Ergebnisse vorweisen ...

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